This school year is like no other and some of you may have even kept your younger children home. We know it’s not easy working from home, trying to help your children with school work, engaging the younger ones, and managing to keep your cool. Here at Boston Baby Nurse & Nanny, we want you to know that we think you are superhuman for juggling all of that! Here are some alphabet activities you can prep after bedtime or on the weekends to help remote learning run more smoothly during the week.

  1. Cut a shape, such as the heart, out of cardboard or thick paper. Take a dot marker and make 26 dots all over it. You can customize this activity for any time of the year; I’ve also made a tree with red dots for apples and a pumpkin in the Fall.
  2. Then, boldly write each letter of the alphabet inside all of the dots.
  3. Give the kids a sticker sheet with all the letters and suggest they try to find the matching letters. Talk about the letters as you go. Ask them, when they take one off the sticker sheet, if they know what sound it makes. For kindergartens and first graders write lowercase letters on your shape and give them uppercase alphabet stickers to match up.
  1. Instead of Cookie Monster, you can create Alphabet Monster. If the word Monster hasn’t been heard before or is too scary, you can call it the Alphabet Alligator (just wrap your box in green paper instead).
  2. Wrap a small box with colored construction paper; if they know who Cookie Monster is than use blue so they can make the connection. If you don’t have a small enough box, cut one and fold it into a new box.
  3. Glue on some googly eyes, teeth, and even a tongue on the inside. For the arms, make a small hole in each side and push pipe cleaner through.
  4. Save up milk and water bottle caps to write letters on. To play the game, pretend to speak like a silly alphabet monster, as you open and close the top. Tell the kids he is hungry for the letter “P!” Can they find the letter and feed it to the Alphabet Monster?

Create a Coconut Tree to Read with Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

chicka chicka boom boom tree

 

  1. From construction paper, cut out a coconut tree and few coconuts. Tape it to a refrigerator or dishwasher that is magnetic. if you want it to last longer, first cover it with clear contact paper or laminate it.
  2. Read Chicka Chicka Boom Boom; and then show them the tree. Can the kids fill up the coconut tree with magnetic letters? Announce the letters as you add them to the tree. You can also have your child re-enact the book as you slowly read through it.
  1. Grab a couple sticks outside to use as fishing rods. Tie a string to them and then hot glue a strong circular magnet.
  2. Draw fish on foam paper, write a letter on them, and then cut them out.
  3. Next, glue a magnet strip on the back (sometimes the adhesive isn’t sticky enough).
  4. Have the magnet strip stick up by the fish’s fin so that it can connect with the fishing rod no matter what side it’s lying on. I used hot glue first, but it didn’t stay well on the foam paper. So, I suggest  super glue; leave it to dry for an hour out of the children’s reach.
  5. Now all you need is a laundry basket to use as the boat! Ask the kids to announce what Letter Fish they caught. Depending on your child’s age you can ask them to tell you the sound of the letter they caught or spell a word with three to four letter fish.

Try out all our remote learning activities, introducing one new alphabet game a week. Share your photos with us on our Facebook page! And checkout more ways to learn the alphabet at home in part 2 of this blog.

About The Author

Kelsey Dickson has over 15 years of experience working with children as a nanny, preschool teacher, and now a mother. She has her degree in Early Childhood Education and works for Boston Baby Nurse & Nanny as the eLearning Manager. Check out our online childcare classes, such as Baby Sign Language and Sleep Coaching 101! In her free time she enjoys gardening with her son, going for walks with her husband and dog, and discovering local wineries in New England.